Choosing self-adhesive breast forms

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #115949
    Airlane1979
    Participant

    Just some practical information required: there are available various silicone breast forms which stick on to the chest. I’d like to know

    • do they stick well?
    • do they always require a bra?
    • does the adhesive gradually lose its effectiveness?

    I don’t want to waste my money.

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  • Author
    Replies
    • #116326

      Hello sisters, I purchased the Devine Aphrodite forms back in June. A little expensive but oh my, so worth the cost. I got a size large to be a 38dd. They adhere good but because of the size you do need a bra.  I am able  to wear them with out a bra when the top or nightie I am wearing has a shelf bra in it. I did use hollister adhesive a few times to attach the girls. It does help and you can go a day or so braless if you want. I got mine from TBFS and the staff there were wonderful in helping. You can use a little foundation to help blend them to your skin color and the edges are then enough to make them almost, i said almost but not always seemless. I hope this helps.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      • #116327

        Thanks, Monica. Your options seem a bit pricey for me but I’ll consider them. I’m not keen on using aerosols for adhesive which are very unfriendly to the environment and Hollister 7730 is ridiculously rip-off expensive at up to £40 for a single canister. I’ll probably stick (no pun intended) with the cheaper versions I already use but at least I’m learning of the alternatives.

        • #116341
          DeeAnn Hopings
          AMBASSADOR

          About Hollister’s…

          The expense of it has to do with the fact that it is a high purity medical grade product. It was originally designed for patients with a stoma in order to make a seal for an ostomy arrangement. Its use for breast forms is just a happy coincidence.

          Regarding chlorofluorocarbons (from https://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2011/10/aerosol-sprays-do-not-damage-the-ozone-layer/:

          Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, in the mid-1970s most manufacturers voluntarily stopped using chlorofluorocarbons. Further, in 1978, chlorofluorocarbons were officially banned in the United States, with a few exceptions. These exceptions were primarily concerning certain medical applications, such as with asthma inhalers (though use in inhalers and other medicinal applications were officially banned in 2008).

          Other countries quickly followed the U.S. in banning the use of chlorofluorocarbons, including Canada, Mexico, Australian, and many European nations. Thanks to the Montreal Protocol agreement, ratified by 70 countries initially and 196 countries to date, production of chlorofluorocarbons, along with other ozone damaging substances, began to be phased out altogether starting in 1996, the completion of which, even in many developing countries, took place in 2010.

          Anyway, chlorofluorocarbons can no longer be used to charge aerosol sprays.

          However, one additional thing about Hollister’s is that the forms must be thoroughly cleaned afterwards. If not, any residue becomes increasing difficult to remove. I have used it in the past and it worked well. As I said, it does require diligence in the clean up process. I quit using it because I didn’t want to invest the time and effort to clean the forms.

          In the US 7730 can be had for no more than 2/3 of the price you mentioned, and sometimes less. Not sure it would be higher in the UK. Imported product, perhaps?

          1 user thanked author for this post.
          • #116359

            Given the record of pharmaceutical corporations around the world, I suspect that Hollister 7730 costs a couple of pounds to manufacture. The rest is profit. As for aerosols, they are still harmful in many ways.

            It is estimated that phasing out of chlorofluorocarbons now stand at 90%, implying that the 10% are still causing damage to the environment. The small percentage is mainly found in developing countries. Even in countries where they have been banned entirely, they have been replaced by propellants containing hydrocarbons, which still contribute to the global warming. The modern CFC-free aerosols still emit the volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which still affect the ozone and the environment. The VOCs are the primary component of the asthma-inducing smog. Besides, the propellants in aerosol cans are highly flammable when in contact with fire and can cause explosions and start fires. Empty aerosol cans are considered as hazardous waste in the US.

            In place of CFCs, aerosols now use hydrocarbons and compressed gases, such as nitrous oxide, as propellants. These chemicals are greenhouse gases and contribute to the global-warming effect. They also contain volatile organic compounds that release ozone into the lower atmosphere and add to smog.

          • #116371
            DeeAnn Hopings
            AMBASSADOR

            Point taken.

            Regarding pricing, 7730 has been around long enough that I suspect the R&D costs and the cost of clinical trials have long been recovered. A stoma is essentially an open wound. The purity of the material is of high importance. Some years ago I was the technical liaison between a group of our R&D folks and the construction personnel for the construction of a Class 100 (can’t remember what the current industry designation is) clean room. Anytime you need a space controlled for temperature, humidity (probably small tolerances for both) and particulate contamination, it becomes expensive to operate and it has to run 24/7 – 365. There also likely complicated maintenance, cleaning and certification procedures that are mandated for the Food & Drug Administration. Volume comes into play also. Given what the product is intended to do, I certainly hope that the market size is fairly limited, but I don’t know what it is. At any rate, it certainly isn’t like the market for aspirin or ibuprofen…

    • #116322
      DeeAnn Hopings
      AMBASSADOR

      Airlane:

      The skin needs to be free of surface oils for best adhesion. I think there also some sprays that slow down the rate that moisture and oils that come to the surface. The effect is making the adhesion last longer.

      You last 2 questions are a function of the size of the breast form. There is a point at which the size and weight of the form is too much for the sticky material. The vendor or manufacturer of your forms should be able to tell you what the limits are. If they cannot, they may not be the one to do business with…

      We don’t have a dedicated fashion and makeup section here, but our sister site, Crossdresser Heaven, does. You might try searching over there or post your question…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #116153
      Bobbie W
      FREE

      I got some from Amazon and I love them but they do NOT stay attached. I ordered some from the brestform store (ad on the page). They should be here in a couple days (I hope). I’ll let you know.

      this is the ones I ordered from Amazon.
      <h1 id=”title” class=”a-size-large a-spacing-none a-color-secondary”><span id=”productTitle” class=”a-size-large product-title-word-break”>Y-NOT Silicone Breast Forms for Crossdresser, Mastectomy Fake Boobs Prosthesis</span></h1>

      1 user thanked author for this post.
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